Revolution in Canada?


Given what we know of the traditional and revisionists causes of the American Revolution, and as we explore various revolutions throughout history, do you think it’s possible to have a revolution in Canada? If so, what kind, under what circumstances and why? Have we had revolutions in the past?

Secondly, how is the revolution you are doing research on different or the same as the American Revolution? Refer to Zinn’s chapter on Revolution and the video below.

Email me if you have questions!

Advertisements

22 thoughts on “Revolution in Canada?

  1. I think that it is possible for Canada to have a revolution but unlikely any time soon! I think that if we were to have a revolution, the whole country would have to be involved which I don't think would happen. The only thing that I could think of that would cause a revolution would be the taxes in Canada. They seem to be very high and some people think that we "can't even get good roads". I don't think this would be enough to cause a revolution though!My group is studying the Russian Revolution, which in some aspects is similar to the American Revolution. They are similar because In Russian during the first world war, many people were poor and rations of bread were starting to become smaller and smaller until almost all the bread was gone. The people in Russia were very poor and they didn't think that the government was treating them properly. In the American Revolution the government was also not treating them properly (Britain) and there were many poor people. Mainly the way the two revolutions started was the most similar, they both started from simply just a few people in the streets striking against the government until it got to millions and the whole country was involved. Nick

  2. I agree with Nick. I think it is fully possible to have a revolution in Canada, and we have come close in the past. I think that Canada does have some things that keep people happy, like free health care, so it would be hard to get a lot of people agreeing with the idea of a revolution, but there is a couple of groups that could start a revolution. Firstly, we could have a revolution because of taxes. Canada has very high taxes and i'm pretty sure not many people like this. Secondly, I think that the Aboriginal groups of Canada could start a revolution because many of them are unhappy with the way that they are represented in government and the way that the government works. Thirdly, I think that groups in Quebec could start a revolution because they want to separate from Canada. My group is researching the French Revolution. It is quite similar to the American Revolution. It is similar because it was fundamentally the same thing. People became angry with the way that the government worked and got angry because of high taxes. The lower and middle class was poor to begin with and with increased taxes, they could barely afford food, while the higher class was living comfortably. Propaganda did not play as much of a roll in the French Revolution though.

  3. Revolution in Canada:Aboriginal Injustice in Canada—Historically and PresentlyAllen LiuGrade 10 American HistoryIn Canada today we take for granted the many things we have and own and often we think we live in a perfect world. Yet this is not the case for everyone and in a similar fashion, Canada does possess a potential for revolution. In this day and age, there exists a division among racial groups with a strict concern for the indigenous populations of Canada. It is the aboriginal populations who today Canada should really be looking towards. The issues of taxation and economic upheavals are perhaps the norm of this century and account for the natural progression of society. A revolution built on racial unfairness, however, may be the next historical tidal wave. Take for instance as how in the next fifty years, the aboriginal population will continue to grow and account for a vast part of Canada. What if, and let us look at the reality of fact, they decide they have had enough. They have become a prominent population in Canada, and they indeed have the resources and potential to start a rebellion. Like the 13 colonies of America, this was the same principle. The ways of oppression are unjust and after a while, the shift of power will be inevitable. But the revolving issue is that many Canadians don’t realize the critical issue of Canada’s colonization and the true impact it had on native society. And it is out of this ignorance, whereby, a revolution may occur so suddenly, unless Canadian society today takes action. Let us then, examine critically the events of the past to conclude exactly the circumstances and reasons for Aboriginal injustice. Canada, as a nation, emerging from a colonial identity, has seen and witnessed the legacies of this past affect many peoples and cultures, which are still in their very existence today. The heart of extending and consolidating the interests of other nations have rendered great impacts onto native and indigenous peoples, whom were the rightful claimers of their land and homes. However, by the influences of the British, Spanish, and French, such fundamentals of life encompassing culture, economy, and religion have been altered, in ways which have deprived the truthful traditions of the past. In our North American society, today, we see the pre-dominant British and French cultures, to which we have grown accustomed to. Inadvertently, the benefits we see today have caused much grief and pain to others, as set forth through colonization. It is then in great demand, that such legacies of colonization be highlighted and addressed, to ensure our society operates in a harmonious fashion, and that the needs of all peoples are met. The idea of colonization was driven by three basic motives: material gain, to spread religion, and a desire to expand territory. The long term effects of colonization impacted the Aboriginal people in the midst of their society’s development. Many colonists felt they were assisting the indigenous populations by bringing them their religion and their civilization. However, the truth of the matter was often, subjugation, unfair treatment, displacement, disease, and even death. Today, we are coming to realize the influences of colonialism, whose impacts are still resonating. The lifestyles of the Aboriginal people were altered against their will and their adaptation to changing conditions was analogous to ripping them from the womb of their culture. With the colonial infiltration camps, came the spread of racial inferiority and the racist views toward the indigenous people. To the colonizers, the Aboriginal’s lack of technologies created a feeling of superiority which led to the oppression of the Aboriginal’s civil rights.

  4. Now to get into specifics, the education aboriginals receive today can be linked backed to their colonization and residential schools. In the past, 1867, the federal government of Canada passed the Indian Act. It had two main intentions surrounding a unified way of handling the affairs of Aboriginal people and more importantly, setting out to find a way to encourage Aboriginal people to adapt to a European life style. It was believed that European culture was better or superior, and by adopting it, First Nations would improve their lives. As a matter of fact, this was completely wrong. The government was misled by ethnocentrism and racist assumptions which caused extreme hardship for the natives. Subsequent to the passing of the Act, contact between various First nations was prevented on reserves and the government sent children to residential schools. Here, family ties were cut off and all traditional ways of life were ceased. Now, let us imagine the suffering this caused, imagine yourself in these children’s shoes and what it would feel like. It coalesced to an extent where they were not even allowed to speak in their own languages. The government, in short, took control of all major decisions concerning these Aboriginal peoples, virtually destroying the culture of the First Nations.Today in Canada the unemployment rate among Aboriginal people aged 15 years and over is high (almost three times higher than the non-Aboriginal rate). Again, this is the result of inadequate conditions garnered to the aboriginal peoples and the result of their assimilation. With the lack of a proper education and other necessities of life, we see this leads to a distinct poverty cycle, thus making these aboriginals an underclass. We as society today, need to break this cycle. How do we do this? It all comes down to providing for these groups at disadvantage with the proper resources, facilities, and adequate funding. In today’s work force, aboriginal peoples will be the workers of tomorrow—a large and significant part of Canada. To society, to the government, an investment via material resources to these aboriginals will be a worthwhile cause, helping such things as gangs, which is a prominent issue we face today in Winnipeg, and in North America. If we examine gang violence and the deaths, damage, and brutality caused by this, the majority of it comes down to aboriginal peoples. It is because they lack a proper education valuing their traditions and beliefs, as to why they choose a life of violence and injustice. We as society today, need to make the conscious effect today to address the problems and lingering effects of colonization. We need to realize that an investment in aboriginal schools, in stopping gangs, and a multitude of programs specifically designed to the First Nations are many of the steps that are needed to help everyone in Canada. The adequate funding and time into this process is a cumbersome project to pursue, yet, if we want society to continue to develop in a positive direction this is what is needed. But, ultimately, it all ties down to—this is what the aboriginals deserve, this is what they need, and this is our compensation for them, as we have prospered at their expense. Let today be a time to reflect on how each and every one of you has come to be, and let us all realize our abilities, and use them for the better. Let us truly invest time, effort, and funds into what is right—and that is to aid our First Nations peoples so that they too, may cherish and soak up life in the breadth of excellence as we do to this very day.

  5. (cont'd) sorry i forgot the other half :)Now to get into specifics, the education aboriginals receive today can be linked backed to their colonization and residential schools. In the past, 1867, the federal government of Canada passed the Indian Act. It had two main intentions surrounding a unified way of handling the affairs of Aboriginal people and more importantly, setting out to find a way to encourage Aboriginal people to adapt to a European life style. It was believed that European culture was better or superior, and by adopting it, First Nations would improve their lives. As a matter of fact, this was completely wrong. The government was misled by ethnocentrism and racist assumptions which caused extreme hardship for the natives. Subsequent to the passing of the Act, contact between various First nations was prevented on reserves and the government sent children to residential schools. Here, family ties were cut off and all traditional ways of life were ceased. Now, let us imagine the suffering this caused, imagine yourself in these children’s shoes and what it would feel like. It coalesced to an extent where they were not even allowed to speak in their own languages. The government, in short, took control of all major decisions concerning these Aboriginal peoples, virtually destroying the culture of the First Nations.Today in Canada the unemployment rate among Aboriginal people aged 15 years and over is high (almost three times higher than the non-Aboriginal rate). Again, this is the result of inadequate conditions garnered to the aboriginal peoples and the result of their assimilation. With the lack of a proper education and other necessities of life, we see this leads to a distinct poverty cycle, thus making these aboriginals an underclass. We as society today, need to break this cycle. How do we do this? It all comes down to providing for these groups at disadvantage with the proper resources, facilities, and adequate funding. In today’s work force, aboriginal peoples will be the workers of tomorrow—a large and significant part of Canada. To society, to the government, an investment via material resources to these aboriginals will be a worthwhile cause, helping such things as gangs, which is a prominent issue we face today in Winnipeg, and in North America. If we examine gang violence and the deaths, damage, and brutality caused by this, the majority of it comes down to aboriginal peoples. It is because they lack a proper education valuing their traditions and beliefs, as to why they choose a life of violence and injustice. We as society today, need to make the conscious effect today to address the problems and lingering effects of colonization. We need to realize that an investment in aboriginal schools, in stopping gangs, and a multitude of programs specifically designed to the First Nations are many of the steps that are needed to help everyone in Canada. The adequate funding and time into this process is a cumbersome project to pursue, yet, if we want society to continue to develop in a positive direction this is what is needed. But, ultimately, it all ties down to—this is what the aboriginals deserve, this is what they need, and this is our compensation for them, as we have prospered at their expense. Let today be a time to reflect on how each and every one of you has come to be, and let us all realize our abilities, and use them for the better. Let us truly invest time, effort, and funds into what is right—and that is to aid our First Nations peoples so that they too, may cherish and soak up life in the breadth of excellence as we do to this very day.

  6. I am going to talk about the possibility to happen a revolution in China instead of Canada because I don’t actually know the Canadian situation that much. (Shame on me). In my opinion, it is completely possible to have a revolution in China in 20 years. The huge gap between rich and poor had misled China into a worse predicament than ever before. We can see thousand of poor farmers scandalized at the expropriation of their land without any compensation all across China every single day. It caused protest and indignation. The countrymen want to take them land back, whatever happens. On the other side, a growing middle class with its wealth tied up in real estates wants to pass their properties to their only children like me. The middle class who make up the base support are butters against the countrymen, the very poor people. (Zinn, 99)These people are really anxious about the security of their property. Government remained loyal to a small group of people. The offer springs of communist revolution established a monopoly on China mainland by force of centralization of power. Bribery and corruption in the government service are rife; the government unresponsive to peoples’ needs. Government acts in isolation from the other forces of society. It is fashionable to say how inadequate the government is. Just as Howard Zinn pointed out, “governments- including the government of the United States- are not neutral, they represent the dominant economic interest, and that their constitutions are intended to serve these interests.”(Zinn, P98). The similarity between China and early America is has a government the shakiness of anyone’s liberty when entrusted to a government of the rich and powerful. And the next China revolution could be a battle for the rights of people to govern their own destinies. The research I am working on is the Cuban Revolution. Some parts of the Cuban revolution are obviously similar with the American Revolution. First at all, both 2 revolutions were wars for independence, but Cuba has had a social revolution at the same time. The revolution against British colonial rule lasted only seven years but the Cuban revolution began in the 1890s and waked in 1959. Most of the Cuban property owners and businessmen chose to exile, they arriving in the United Sates after 1959. Most of them were white and well to do. Those exiles held the close tie of their class to conservative United States politicians.This group of people is similar with the people whom loyal to British during American Revolution. Jasmine

  7. Revolution is indeed a lingering notion that is present throughout all of Canada. Canada has already experienced a wide variety of “revolutions” from women to workers. But if we step back and take a look at our (world) history we see that the vast majority of revolutions are caused through corruption, suppression and many aspects of the economy. Canada today might not exhibit corruption that we know of but, they do indeed illustrate some forms of suppression on the minorities. Native Americans and the French Quebec population fall victim to the Canadian government “so to speak”. Civil unrest has, and is taking place from terrorist groups such as the FLQ and strikes on native reserves. A revolution is dependent on the people who will support it and carry it out and with our present day situation both requirements are more realistic than they appear. It is no longer a question of whether or not revolution is possible in Canada rather it has become a question of, when and who will carry it out?To some extent the Cuban revolution was a fight for liberation, a fight against a bureaucratic dictator regime, with a growing consensus of the population. With questionable results the Cuban revolutions held more significant meaning to its people in order to overthrow the current oppressive power. Unlike the American revolutions where citizens were unaware of the conflicts and the justifications of their battle, the Cuban revolutions meaning and reasoning reached the people making them fight for it rather than forced into conflicts. Both resulted in a reformation of the current political system and the change of leaders. However today the American Revolution shows a more prosperous outcome than that of the Cuban revolution following the fall of Batista and the rise of Castro. The aspects that separate these two revolutions apart are perhaps, not the methods and its results but the meaning it held for its people and the change it has made for their lives.

  8. I do not think that a revolution could happen in Canada. A revolution needs the lower class to loss of faith in the government, which I don't think will happen. I don't think it will happen because I think that our government is run well enough that we have enough social programs help the poor, and low enough taxes to keep the rich from being dissatisfied I am doing research on the Russian revolution, which is different from the American revolution in that the poor were truly oppressed, and in that after the revolution took place there was a major government shift that changed how all the Russians lived, or going from a capitalist society to a communist one.

  9. I think that, while a revolution in Canada is definitely possible, the conditions would have to be exactly right for one to occur. For one, a revolution has to be kick started by an issue, one which the people of a given country are united against. This is something that might deter the start of a revolution in Canada, since we are a country with a wide spread and incredibly diverse population. I imagine it would be hard to find any one issue that more than half of the citizens of our country could completely agree upon and rebel against. The only circumstance in which I can see Canada having a revolution anytime in the near future is one in which Quebec rebels against the Canadian government in an effort to establish themselves as an independent country.As for my revolution project, my group is, in fact, studying the American Revolution. For that reason, I can't really answer the second question.

  10. I believe that there is a possibility for a revolution in Canada. This does not mean that it will happen soon, yet there are many reasons for it to happen in the future. One of the main problems brought forward is the french province of Quebec wanting to split up from the rest of Canada. Quebec is currently almost undertaking a quiet revolution with violence in dealing with the FLQ, whom are considered "french terrorists". Quebec is both separated from the rest of Canada in having their own anthem "Gens du pays". They are somewhat linked to the rest of Canada in how the country is bilingual and in many other ways. If Quebec were to separate from Canada, it could possibly cause a recession, taxation and a decrease in amount of natural resources, leading to many problems. The Russian revolution has many similarities with the American revolution as well as differences. The American revolution resembles the Russian revolution in that both governments treated their people very poorly, leading to poverty. Both revolutions started with as rebellion from the the government as well. The difference is that the Russian Revolution had a drastic shift of government improving how the people in the society lived as the revolution took place.

  11. It is possible that a revolution could occur in Canada, but as Daniel said it isn’t as much of a question as to if it can happen or not but rather when and who will carry it out? The Aboriginal people of Canada could start a revolution because many of them are unhappy with the way they are represented in government and the way that the government works. Raising the price of taxes is also a main component to the cause of a revolution. Another case that could potentially start a revolution is various groups in Quebec. Quebec has been inquiring in separating from Canada for a few years now; therefore there is a slight chance that this could get to the point where they begin to rebel and essentially initiate a “Canadian Revolution”. A raise in taxes is effectively what caused the American Revolution to take place, so it is a possibility that this would happen in Canada as well. However, that was an extremely long time ago and since then Canada has been through a significant amount and has substantially grown and developed, proving that revolution isn’t to be expected. Canada is a well-organized and successful country, so the chances of a revolution occurring are slim. During a recession, a raise in taxes wouldn’t be unexpected, although it did not seem to take place during the recession that just hit, verifying that a revolution in Canada is improbable. Through the research my group has done on the Industrial revolution, it is clear that it can’t compare to the American Revolution at all. Citizens of America were not in favour of anything that took place during the American Revolution and it definitely caused controversy and rebellions. The Industrial Revolution happened during the 18th century; major changes in agriculture, manufacturing, mining, transport, and technology had a profound effect on the socioeconomic and cultural conditions starting in the United Kingdom, and then subsequently spreading throughout Europe, North America, and eventually the world. The Industrial Revolution was actually beneficial and caused people to work harder. Most people began working longer hours and decided to move into more urban areas of different cities, instead of living on farms in rural areas. In fact, it provided the workers with hope in becoming successful and more educated since many of the company owners or creators were uneducated men. The idea of the new type of work was initially exciting and to many promised hope for their future.

  12. I do not think that a revolution is possible in Canada in it's current status. There isn't an absolute reason for Canada to have a revolution, except maybe for taxes. We have very high taxes but Canadian citizens are tolerant and those taxes are being used for social services, healthcare, infrastructure, education and public safety. To name a few. Our government helps the poor and unemployed with programs such as welfare. It is also runs well enough that people are not dissatisfied of how and well it is being run.We had the Quiet revolution of 1960.I am doing the French Revolution and I believe that they are similar. France did not like how their government ran the country. They did not welcome the high taxes. The gap between the rich and poor was widening. And the fact that King Louis XVI supported, the American revolution helped his downfall.

  13. There are many reasons why a revolution may occur in Canada. If we look at the definition of a revolution: "A revolution (from the Latin revolutio, 'a turn around') is a fundamental change in power or organizational structures that takes place in a relatively short period of time." It does not say that revolution is when people of countries split up. Though this is what occurs most of the time it does not have to happen. The American Revolution was a unique revolution if it is considered a revolution at all in that the Americans were able to split up with the British. There are a few reasons why we could. One reason is that the groups of people like the French or Native Americans become unhappy and decide to try to revolutionize the Canadian government. Though what I have listed is internal factors we can't forget that the American Revolution and the possibility of a Canadian revolution could be caused by the external factors. The reason the American Revolution occurred was because of Britain. The revolution didn't start when the American Elite started to pump up the poor it started when the British government decided to tax Colonists. If Britain does something that the Canadian government is against strongly then we could have a revolution. I don't think Canada will because we are very lucky that we are friendly with both Britain and the US. I do believe we could have a revolution but I wouldn't see the reasoning behind it. There is a chance good things will happen but there is a chance it could end horribly. Most revolutions are violent and the American's were very lucky. The American Elites had so much against them and they got extremely lucky when fighting one of the biggest armies in the world. I can guarantee that if you ask someone if they would want a revolution they would say no. They aren't decided, they slowly just happen. Oscar Wilde said "When liberty comes with hands dabbled in blood it is hard to shake hands with her." What this quote means is that Revolutions come with so much violence and blood most of the time that most people don't want it. There are a few people who might want it for personal reasons like the American Elite who are able to manipulate the others but in general I don't think we naturally would. To conclude I believe that Canada could possibly have a revolution but I don't think people would risk their lives for a potential result.

  14. A revolution could occur anywhere, really. It is possible for one to occur in Canada for a few different reasons. One possibility is that Quebec will try to be independent from Canada (and they have tried this in the past). A large amount of the Canadian Government is french and I personally don't have an opinion on whether they should be independent or not. This would be a revolution because it would be a major change in the Canadian Government, seeing as the French have such a major part in the government.Another cause for a revolution would be the extremely high taxes, we as Canadians agree to pay. It is possible for the people who don't want to accept these taxes could create a revolution, but I don't find this very likely.My group is doing the Industrial Revolution and for the Industrial revolution basically what happened is that instead of everyone working on farms people started working in factories. I don't think this is very similar to the American Revolution.

  15. I think if a revolution happened in Canada it wouldn't be by the people in Quebec. Some people in Quebec want to separate from Canada but not conquer all of Canada. A revolution also wouldn't happen because of high taxes like in the American Revolution. We pay high taxes and get social services, the Colonists payed high taxes and got nothing. I think if we were to have a revolution it would be the natives leading it. Many natives still live on reservations away from everybody else, of course they can leave but the fact that they are there implies people don't want them. Also in Canada racism is not a big problem at all, except towards natives. Many people think that natives are violent drunks, don't work for a living and just take the taxpayers money. Since so much prejudice is directed towards the natives, and because they were here first, it may give them the want to have small rebellions and eventually a full scale revolution.

  16. Ji wrote:Has Canada had revolutions in the past? Quebec had a revolution that came to be known as the "Quiet Revolution". It was a period of rapid change experienced in Quebec from 1960 to 1966. It was a revolution against traditionalism, conservatism, and contemporary ways and values. The fist change during the Quiet Revolution was the rejection of past values. Much of the traditionalism that characterised the past was replaced by increasingly liberal attitudes. Also, there was an intense social change. The current of decolonisation and the movement for civil rights made social and national unfairness increasingly difficult to accept. In these 6 years, Quebec went through many changes. It became the province with the highest taxes and dept from the least taxed and the least indebted of the Canadian Provinces. A large and professional state bureaucracy was rapidly set up, many government departments and agencies were created, and public institutions that had not existed previously appeared. Is it possible to have a revolution in Canada? If so, what kind, under what circumstances and why? Quebec might want to separate from Canada. They call themselves "francophone". They obviously have a different culture and already had some thoughts of separating, including: They feel excluded from English-speaking Canada, often because of Federal government policy which often doesn¡¯t reflect the Québécois interests. They are concerned about being swamped by an increasing English-speaking majority. And also, the Aboriginal population is increasing rapidly. According to the CBC News, Canada¡¯s aboriginal population surged past the million mark for the first time on a Canadian census, a spike of 45 percent from a decade earlier (2006). There are approximately 1,172,790 Indian, Métis and Inuit people, accounting for 3.8 percent of Canada¡¯s total population. The growth of the Aboriginal population is 6 times faster than the non-aboriginal population. However, their circumstances are very bad compared to non-aboriginal people. Since they are usually poor and often face discrimination, there's a possibility that they could revolt. Lastly, immigrants could start a revolution. There are many immigrants in Canada. Canada is one of the top 10 countries that have many immigrants. However, they tend to be poorly treated in Canadian society. Most immigrants have often been confronted with some kind of discrimination. For instance, they have had to take the hardest, worst paid jobs, and often have difficulty being accepted entirely into society. They are often blamed for social and economic problems. Arabians are discriminated because they are perceived as sharing the national background of terrorists responsible for attacking the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. How is the Russian Revolution different or the same as the American Revolution? In both the Russian and American Revolutions, there were the leaders who lead people. However, in the American Revolution, the leaders were ¡°the elites¡±: wealthy landowners and businessmen, while Russian leaders were relatively "normal" people: a middle class lawyer (Lenin), newspaper writer (Trotsky) and a soldier (Stalin). The Americans rebelled against King George III, who was depicted as a tyrant. In the Russian Revolution, the Russians rebelled against Czar Nicholas II, who was a tyrant.And also, Russian had two times of revolution while the American Revolution was one consequent event.

  17. It is possible for Canada to have a revolution. Although Canada has come very close to a revolution in the past, it is very unlikely that one would happen in the near future. There aren’t really that many reasons that would cause a revolution. There are only two significant problems that come to mind and those are our high taxes and Quebec wanting to establish their own country. I don’t think Canadian citizens see the taxes as big enough of a problem to cause a revolution because the taxes are being used for social services unlike the Colonists, who paid high taxes and got not in return. My group is researching the Cuban Revolution. Both revolutions are similar as they were both planned out in order to obtain independence. The American Revolution was more strategically planned and therefore had a better outcome compared to the Cuban Revolution. Cuba is still somewhat sheltered in the sense that they haven’t had much time to evolve on their own or witness new leaders.

  18. I think it is possible for Canada to have a revolution. I dont believe it would occur because of Quebec's attempt to separate but involve the Native American people. Many Native Americans believe they have the right to land they lost hundreds of years ago. Many are angry and in fairness they have the right to be angry.Many native americans live on reservations.They might not be forced to live on these reservations but secluding them like this may make them believe they do not belong and are unwelcome. Many experience difficulties adjusting to living in a city and do not have much luck with finding jobs.Leaders of different tribes may begin to revolt for more power. These people's ancestors where the first people in the country we live in today.They have barely any say in the way the country is run and more importantly how their people function in society.How is this fair? Canada's revolution may be about the rights of Native Americans for their land and their place in the government and their decisions.This sort of revolution could also occur in Australia. The native people of Australia where also colonized by the English. In both Canada and Australia the majority of unemployment and people in prisons are aboriginal. Couinsedence?

  19. I think it is possible for Canada to have a revolution at any time. It could even be in the near future. I think it could be a revolution based on language and culture. If Quebec decides to separate from Canada, it would be a major revolution which would change the lives of Canadians dramatically. In 1970 with the FLQ crisis, we came very close to having a revolution. Since then, Quebec has voted a couple of times whether to separate or stay a part of Canada. These votes came very close to being a majority. It is a good thing that they did not decide to separate because it would have changed our lives dramatically.My group studied the American Revolution. The American Revolution is quite unique compared to other revolutions. Generally, revolutions occur in order for a major social or political change to take place. In the case of the American Revolution, the changes were less significant. The change in power was from the British elite to the American elite, and the poor remained poor. The changes in the Russian Revolution were more dramatic, but they did not last long. At least in the American Revolution, the changes lasted.

  20. I think that it is possible yet very unlikely that Canada would have a revolution in the near future. If there were to be one however ever it would most likely be started by Quebec. It is known that there are government officials and other people in Quebec wanting to separate from the rest of Canada and become their own country. These people believe that Quebec's culture is too different from the rest of Canada to be a part of it and want to be recognized as their own country. This however will most likely not take place in the near future for a few reasons. First off, Quebec on its own is not capable of supporting itself financially on its own. At this moment they rely a lot on the Canadian government. They have tried asking France to support them, but being a strong trade partner and allies of Canada they decided not to get involved and rejected them. In there past there has been a revolution in Canada called the quiet revolution between Quebec and the rest of Canada. For my prezi I did the French Revolution. The French and American revolutions were very different yet there were some similarities. For example in both cases the ending result was in a change in government. Also the revolutionist believed they weren't being treated fairly by the government. In the French revolution they were being treated very poorly and many people were starving, in the American however the "Founding Fathers" convinced that the British government was taxing them without giving them proper representation. The revolutions were very different than each other though, because of what the revolutionist were fighting for. The Americans were fighting because the rich wanted more money and power than they already had, the poor French however need to fight to survive. Also, the Americans separated themselves from the British whereas the French over through and changed the government in place.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s