Explaining Everything: 1911-1947

Throughout the last few weeks, our History of Modern China crew as become highly interested in the period following the revolution in 1911 and ending with the defeat of the Nationalists by the CCP. This period witnessed incredible change, war, death, and displacement.


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ISIL: History & The Future

This week, the University of Winnipeg will be hosting what it dubs Middle East Week. Every year, the fourth-ranked undergraduate university in Canada hosts a variety of lectures, debates, and screenings in order to examine critical issues within the Middle East.

This year, the University will be hosting Canadian journalist Gwynne Dyer who speaks Monday night (February 22nd) at 7:00 PM. Dyer will be speaking about the future of ISIL. In anticipation of his appearance, Terry McLeod of CBC Radio interviewed both Dyer and Professor Rory Dixon from the University of Winnipeg on Sunday, February 21st.

ISIL’s emergence and future is complex and takes a great deal of careful research, listening, reflection, and critical thought. As such, let’s delve into how ISIL and the complexity of the Middle East came to be and what potential solutions might exist. For those in Global Issues, this might play well into your research for your major papers and Take Action Projects.

The BBC: Why Border Lines Drawn with a Ruler in WWI still Rock the Middle East

Below this post, share your thoughts on why you think there is such disruption and destruction in the region and how or if it might end.

Al Jazeera: How Can ISIL be Defeated?

Furthermore, what should Canada’s response be? How is this now more than a regional conflict?

Al Jazeera: What Would TE Lawrence do?

Ensure that you use evidence to support your arguments and that when you respond to peers, please be courteous. Please also only use first names.

 

MLTS: Reflection

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Strini Reddy speaks to educators about the Newcomer Youth Education Support Services — the organization supported by the screening of Most Likely to Succeed

On Wednesday, February 3rd, over 200 educators came together at the University of Winnipeg to view the provocative film Most Likely to Succeed. The film challenged whether or not the current educational paradigm meets the needs and challenges of the 21st century.

The film addressed several major themes in terms of learning, teaching, and the purpose of education. From the brief discussion that followed the screening, it is clear that everyone in the room reacted differently to this experience.

Please feel free to reflect on what you thought about the film below. As we do with our more formal learning communities, please ensure that our comments are precise, respectful and not anonymous.

On behalf of St. John’s-Ravenscourt School and the Faculty of Education at the University of Winnipeg, thank you for sharing time and space with us.