DoNow: Canada 150

Welcome to our friends from Cape Breton! This week, the Maples Met School hosts our new friends from Glace Bay, Nova Scotia and then in June, our Metsters will be head to the East Coast.

We have some really exciting activities planned for the upcoming week, including experiences at the Manitoba Museum, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, Winnipeg Harvest, The Forks, the Winnipeg Art Gallery, Upper Fort Garry, the Royal Aviation Museum, and much more!

One event will situate us at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. On Thursday, March 16th, the Walrus, a Canadian magazine which looks at current affairs, literature, and general interest articles, is hosting a discussion series called We Desire a Better Country. The event is sold out, but we have managed to secure a few tickets!

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Image from the Walrus Magazine

This is a really profound proposition and this week we would like you to contemplate a couple of things. First, in light of Canada 150, what has been the impact of Confederation on both Nova Scotia and Manitoba? What have been the causes and consequences of Confederation in both provinces and how has it impacted people, the land, the ecology, and how each province governs itself?

Secondly, looking at the continuity and change of each province, how might we construct a better Canada? What do we mean by better and for whom?

In your groups of four, you need to respond in the following ways:

  1. On Monday, begin to create a skit, song, or performance of any kind which answers the two questions above. (We will provide you time throughout the week to work on this.)
  2. Elect a person from your group to attend the Walrus talk on Thursday.
  3. Each group needs to respond to the questions using FlipGrid. Each member can provide a response, or all four members can create one.

On Friday, March 17th, groups will be able to present their performances at our potluck dinner at the Maples Met. If you are using social media throughout the week, please use the following hashtag: #DoNowCanada150.

We will be posting photos, tweets, and FlipGrid responses throughout the week, so be precise, be courteous, and be thoughtful. As you venture from place to place, be sure to collect evidence for your responses. (Hint: Take pictures, write notes, post photos, Tweet links, etc.)

You can follow the Maples Met on Twitter and Instagram

 

 

Genocide: Then & Now

On Wednesday, March 16th, our Global Issues class was able to participate in Kairos Canada’s Blanket Activity. We were joined by members of the Wildwood neighbourhood and also by members of the congregation of Fort Garry United.

The experience allowed us to explore Canada’s colonial history through the lens of indigenous peoples. We were led by Cree elder Connie Budd from the Northend Stella Community Ministry.

Here is one small group reflection that was captured:

On Thursday, March 17th, 2016, our Global Issues class took part in the 15th Annual Holocaust Symposium at the University of Winnipeg. There, we heard from Holocaust survivour Pinchas Gutter, who spoke of his journey.

Using both of these experiences, reflect on the notion of genocide. What are your takeaways from these experiences? How have the informed you or not?

Using the following Padlet, comment on your takeaways from the experience using text, audio and/or video.

Romance of the Far Fur Country: Reconciliation?

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Photo from HBCheritage.ca

Over the past few months, we have really explored and researched the HBC, as it this corporation seems to be pretty significant in the development of Canada, for better or for worse.

Prior to the break, we watched Kevin Nikkel‘s Romance of the Far Fur Country, an HBC film from 1919, which demonstrated the impact of the HBC from a certain perspective. To refresh ourselves, here is a small clip:

Today, we are going to watch On the Trail of the Far Fur Country, a documentary featuring Kevin taking the film to the different communities originally visited in 1919. As we watch it, can you identify any themes of reconciliation? Despite the negative impact of the HBC in some communities, does this documentary offer a glimmer of hope in terms of repairing the relationship between indigenous peoples and the rest of Canada? Why or why not?

Please respond below and please use your Extraordinary Canadians name when you comment.

Winnipeg General Strike via Dickens & Williams

Winnipeg-GeneralStrike10Given the most recent decision by the Canadian Museum of History to rethink the display of the Winnipeg General Strike identified by the Toronto Star last week, we have decided to speak to the significance of the labour action taken almost 100 years through the literacy we have been reading. Both A Street Car Named Desire and Great Expectations discuss notions of class, race, gender, and ethnicity in relation to social justice and we have used this though experiment to look at Winnipeg in 2015.

 

The Politics of Fear?

Photo from MacLean's

Photo from MacLean’s

Lately, we have been speaking about the politics of fear with our recent investigation into Bill C-51. MacLean’s Magazine has recently created an aggregate page looking ta last week’s national discussion on the Niqab and whether or not a state has the right to take away someone’s right to wear what they want a certain ceremonies. You can listen to an interview with Minister Jason Kenney below:

Here is an editorial from the Toronto Star which counters what the Minister states: http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2015/03/14/harper-should-follow-our-secular-law-on-niqab-siddiqui.html?app=noRedirect

Here is Nadia Kidwai, parent of SJR students, in the Winnipeg Free Press: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/analysis/muslims-are-canadians-and-vice-versa-296404181.html

Here are the comments from CPC MP Larry Miller:

What do you think? Should the state be able to restrict the civil liberties of citizens, or does this have to do with another issue?

Let’s use our historical thinking skills to help us understand Canada’s history with restricting civil liberties. Below is a photo of the legislation signed by then Justice Minister Louis St. Laurent designrf to segregate Japanese citizens. St. Laurent would become Prime Minister

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Here is also a fantastic article on the War Measures Act, both in 1914 and 1970, and the alien exclusion legislation (the fastest created in history) created during the Winnipeg General Strike: http://www.therecord.com/opinion-story/4774484-war-measures-act-eroded-civil-liberties/

What do you think? Should women be denied the right to wear a Niqab in Canada? How has Canada defended and restricted civil liberties in history and is this important for our current discussion?

Please use #CCW2015, #SJRLaw and #SJRCanHis to respond, or use the space below. Be concise, courteous , and smart.