China: An History of Shared Human Existence

This year in the History of Modern China class, we have narrowed our understanding of history into two ideas. the first is what Hegel might call a quest to understand human existence, and the second, as according to Desmond Morton, sees history as a shared human experience.

If this is the case, that history can be qualified by what both Hegel and Morton offer, how does your inquiry into Modern Chinese history help us understand either or both our existence on this planet and how we might conceptualize our shared human experience?

Can you use examples from news articles in recent weeks to help you argue your case? What specific events, movements and people might be fodder for your claims? Read the following article and watch the film from this Aljazera article to help you: http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/05/china-cultural-revolution-50-media-blackout-160516050538313.html

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Taiping Rebellion

117159-004-AF41477AFor Reading Reflection 5 in the History of Modern China course, we examine arguably one of the most significant events in China’s modern history. We were shocked to find that we new little about this event and very little attention is paid to it by western historians.

We decided to investigate this rebellion, using many of the historical thinking concepts. Here is a sampling of our thinking:

 

https://create.lensoo.com/embed/bv3Z

https://www.showme.com/sma/embed/?s=9FJJG7M

https://www.showme.com/sma/embed/?s=kfu32DA

Qing Dynasty: Cause & Consequence

chinamap2Over the past few weeks in the History of Modern China, we have been looking at the six historical thinking concepts and how these might lead us to ask powerful questions about history. Here is a sampling of how we used cause and consequence in order to develop research questions and subsequent arguments related to the rise and fall of the Qing dynasty.