CBC Resources of the Week

420px-CBC_Logo_1974-1986.svgIf you teach a Grade 9 Social Studies, or Canada in the Contemporary World, in Manitoba, the CBC essentially taught the course in one weekend.

Here are some highlights that I will be using this week:

CBC The 180 with Jim Brown interviewed Mark Jarvis from the Mowat Centre at the University of Toronto. Jarvis has created a map that essentially looks at statistics related to wellness of Canadians based on the incredible US version created by the New York Times.

Jarvis found, however, that it was really difficult to create a similar map for Canada, given that there is a limitation to our data. He suggests that is is due to the cancelling of the long-form census of the Harper Government. Here is the Mowat’s Centre’s Map, complete with areas in grey that have no data. (Note how much of Manitoba is in grey.)

Mowat Centre: Where are the Hardest Places to Live?

The map itself can help students tell the story of Canada in terms of colonialism, resources, physical geography, climate, drainage basins, etc.

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On The House with Evan Solomon, panelists weighed in on the fact that the Conservatives have announced they will not be participating in federal debates organized by the media consortium. Mark Kennedy and Jennifer Ditchburn discuss the rationale behind controlling the debates and the affect this might have on the voter and democracy.

The At Issue Panel on the National also weighed in on the Conservative plan: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/at-issue-the-debate-over-debates-1.2974978

haulin-oatsIn terms of Law, Terry O’Reilly, host of Under the Influence, had an incredible show on famous lawsuits, Tort Law, and the entire area of Civil Law. I think I might use this by having students create statements of claims and defences, assuming roles for either the plaintiff or the respondent.

On Spark with Nora Young, they looked at how video games of the future will be focusing on empathy as a major outcome of the gaming experience. In the game War of Mine, students can contemplate the role of media/games in society and also learn about the conflict in Bosnia, about Canada’s peacekeeping role, and about genocide.

Lastly, again on The 180, Jason Kirby of MacLean’s Magazine provides a reality check on Canada’ economy, revealing some surprising facts and limitations of our economic foundation. Interestingly enough, Canada exports more fur to China than vehicles. Who knew?

Canada-exports

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Theories of Justice: Application

Photo taken from cognitivephilosophy.net

Photo taken from cognitivephilosophy.net

In today’s learning experience, we investigated the concept of Justice and how various people have conceptualized it. We learned what Kant, Bentham, Aristotle, Locke, and Rawls all had to say about the idea of Justice. Michael Sandel helped us realize that Justice is not a concrete idea, but one that is very much up for debate:

We tried to match our understandings of justice with the scenarios he posed and then we tried to see how the theorists we explored might view justice in the context of the trolley car example.Here are the resources we looked at in the event you need to refresh yourself:

Bentham: https://www.evernote.com/l/AI83q45ycZ9GH7TTeNj4b1iL1Pu8OD5WHAE

Locke: https://www.evernote.com/l/AI887xh_MLdLXZ1LRf8FIfZ76XCcKaqIaP8

Kant: https://www.evernote.com/l/AI95p7gavNJEX7OWWY4BL2jQW93iRXlp5DQ

Aristotle: https://www.evernote.com/l/AI_asHETlR9CxKYB-Cae1woeL9pcSHswbhM

Rawls: https://www.evernote.com/l/AI_ub8cKwTZHNrjVM9wTEIT37apHEQFQMyk

Now here are the facts of a real case in Canadian legal history. What we would like you to do is familiarize yourself with the facts of the case and then comment on how your philosopher might perceive justice in this case. Next, what would be justice for you? Comment and/or comment on what someone else has said. Be courteous, concise, and thoughtful. Take time to reflect and read what your peers have offered.

CASE OF ROBERT LATIMER- FACTS OF THE CASE

On October 24, 1993, Robert Latimer, a farmer from Saskatchewan, placed the helpless body of his 12 year old daughter, Tracy, in his pick up truck and connected a hose from the exhaust to the cab resulting in her asphyxiation by carbon monoxide poisoning.

Tracy had been born severely disabled with cerebral palsy and at age 12 still had the mental capacity of a three month old. She was completely dependent on her parents for round the clock care. Just prior to the events that would lead to his arrest, Latimer had been told that his daughter would require further operations to correct a hip dislocation that had been aggravated by her advanced scoliosis- a condition that had reached the point where her spine diverged from a perpendicular position by 75%. He was advised that the operation would place her in even greater pain than the intense pain she was already experiencing. Moreover, because of other anti-convulsive medication she had to take to control her epileptic seizures, she could not be given pain killers of greater strength than regular Tylenol without the risk of inducing a coma. Latimer would later contend that he was faced with the dilemma of subjecting his daughter to ever more agonizing operations without the ability to limit the intensity of her pain because of the adverse interaction between the drugs she was taking and any pain medication stronger than regular Tylenol.

It was under these circumstances, he would claim, that he chose to end her life.

October 24, 1993- Wilkie, Saskatchewan, Latimer ‘places’ his 12 year old severely disabled daughter- Tracy -in cab of pickup truck- piping CO into the cab through a series of connecting pipes and hoses and resulting in her death by asphyxiation.

November 4, 1993- RCMP bring Latimer in for questioning and arrest him on charge of 1st degree murder.