CdnPoli DoNow: Ratifying Climate Deal

Saturday April 23, 2016

Editorial Cartoon by Graeme MacKay, The Hamilton Spectator – Saturday April 23, 2016 

In November 2015, the Federal Government, led by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, signed the Paris Climate Change agreement, whereby Canada, amongst other countries,pledged to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the extent that global temperature increases could be kept under two degrees.

You can check out this TED talk by Johan Rockstrom to get a clear understanding of the impending ecological crisis:

Johan Rockström Planetary Boundaries from john on Vimeo.

In this Globe and Mail article, the premier of Saskatchewan, Brad Wall, expressed concern that the provinces, members of the federation of Canada, have not been consulted.

Here is a Liberal MP speaking with the CBC about the need to ratify the Paris Agreement.

Using some of your new parliamentary literacy, answer the following question: Should Canada consult with the provinces before ratifying the Paris agreement and should Canada be doing more in terms of reducing emissions?

Answer using the comment section below or Twitter, Instagram, Vine, and/or other social media. Be sure to use the hashtag #cdnpoliDoNow. Be sure to use evidence from the sources provided and from your own research to support your claims.


 

For those keeping track of outcomes for your portfolio, here are some you may wish to address and provide evidence for:

Grade 9

Social Studies

  • Give examples of ways in which government affects their daily lives. Examples: rights and freedoms, security, laws, education, health care, services…
  • Describe Canadian parliamentary democracy. Include: constitutional monarchy, federalism, Governor General, Prime Minister, Cabinet, House of Commons, Senate.
  • Describe the responsibilities and processes of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the federal government.
  • Be sensitive to the impact of majority rule on minorities and marginalized groups.
  • Evaluate Canadian perspectives regarding current global issues.
  • Give examples of Canada’s participation within international organizations. Examples: United Nations, Commonwealth, la Francophonie, Olympics…
  • Evaluate implications of living in a consumer-based economy.

Science

  • Develop a formula for domestic power consumption costs, and solve related problems.

ELA

  • question and reflect on personal responses, predictions, and interpretations; apply personal viewpoints to diverse situations or circumstances
  • acknowledge the value of others’ ideas and opinions in exploring and extending personal interpretations and viewpoints
  • analyze and explain connections between previous experiences, prior knowledge, and a variety of texts [including books]
  • obtain information and varied perspectives when inquiring or researching using a range of information sources [such as expository essays, books, radio and television transcripts, charts, tables, graphs, diagrams…]

ICT

  • Discuss information, ideas, and/or electronic work using tools for electronic communication. (Examples: email, electronic whiteboards, web pages, threaded discussions, videoconferences, chats, instant messages, camera phones, wikis, blogs, podcasts, online whiteboards…)

 

Grade 10

Geography

  • Draw conclusions and make decisions based on research and various types of evidence.

    Explain the importance of stewardship in the preservation of the Earth’s complex environment.

    Respect the Earth as a complex environment in which humans have important responsibilities.

    Describe sustainability issues related to natural resource extraction and consumption.

 

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PechaKucha Youth Night

PechaKucha_20x20_-_Winnipeg

On June 16th, PechaKucha Winnipeg is inviting youth in the Global Issues course to participate in the first ever PechaKucha Winnipeg Youth Night. The evening will take place at the Park Theatre in Winnipeg.

PechaKucha presentations require presenters to create 20 slides which move every 20 seconds, whether they like it or not. These types of presentations have proven highly effective and rigorous and are a perfect fit for the Grade 12 Global Issues course. All students in Manitoba who take the Global Issues course are tasked with an inquiry project called a Take Action Process. Many educators have found that the PechaKucha presentation is a perfect vehicle for learners to discuss their planning and process while presenting their action in a compelling manner. (See an example below.)

Ad Culture to Permaculture – PechaKucha Victoria #10 from Christopher Heffley on Vimeo.

If you are a teacher or parent of a Global Issues students or if you are a Global Issues student and want to present you Take Action Project on June 16th at the PechaKucha Youth night on June 16th, please fill out the following form. Deadline for application is March 16th, 2016.

 

CBC Resources of the Week

420px-CBC_Logo_1974-1986.svgIf you teach a Grade 9 Social Studies, or Canada in the Contemporary World, in Manitoba, the CBC essentially taught the course in one weekend.

Here are some highlights that I will be using this week:

CBC The 180 with Jim Brown interviewed Mark Jarvis from the Mowat Centre at the University of Toronto. Jarvis has created a map that essentially looks at statistics related to wellness of Canadians based on the incredible US version created by the New York Times.

Jarvis found, however, that it was really difficult to create a similar map for Canada, given that there is a limitation to our data. He suggests that is is due to the cancelling of the long-form census of the Harper Government. Here is the Mowat’s Centre’s Map, complete with areas in grey that have no data. (Note how much of Manitoba is in grey.)

Mowat Centre: Where are the Hardest Places to Live?

The map itself can help students tell the story of Canada in terms of colonialism, resources, physical geography, climate, drainage basins, etc.

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On The House with Evan Solomon, panelists weighed in on the fact that the Conservatives have announced they will not be participating in federal debates organized by the media consortium. Mark Kennedy and Jennifer Ditchburn discuss the rationale behind controlling the debates and the affect this might have on the voter and democracy.

The At Issue Panel on the National also weighed in on the Conservative plan: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/at-issue-the-debate-over-debates-1.2974978

haulin-oatsIn terms of Law, Terry O’Reilly, host of Under the Influence, had an incredible show on famous lawsuits, Tort Law, and the entire area of Civil Law. I think I might use this by having students create statements of claims and defences, assuming roles for either the plaintiff or the respondent.

On Spark with Nora Young, they looked at how video games of the future will be focusing on empathy as a major outcome of the gaming experience. In the game War of Mine, students can contemplate the role of media/games in society and also learn about the conflict in Bosnia, about Canada’s peacekeeping role, and about genocide.

Lastly, again on The 180, Jason Kirby of MacLean’s Magazine provides a reality check on Canada’ economy, revealing some surprising facts and limitations of our economic foundation. Interestingly enough, Canada exports more fur to China than vehicles. Who knew?

Canada-exports