Historical Thinking Walking Tour 2015!

About to enter Upper Fort Garry, the birthplace of Manitoba.

About to enter Upper Fort Garry, the birthplace of Manitoba.

Yesterday, we had an amazing and hopefully educative experience where we were able to walk throughout downtown Winnipeg and engage in the pursuit of several important questions. The first question we are tackling has two parts: firstly, who were the Métis, and secondly, who are the Métis in 2015? To help us with this, we have been reading Joseph Boyden’s Louis Riel and Gabriel Dumont and Katherena Vermette’s North End Love Songs. She will be joining us in person on Thursday.

Our next line of questioning has to do with two of the historical thinking concepts; that of historical significance an continuity and change. Throughout your walk, where we visited the Forks, Upper Fort Garry, the St. Boniface Museum, and the Winnipeg Railway Museum, what has changed? What has remained the same? How fast was this change and why?

Who were the Métis? At the St. Boniface Museum

Who were the Métis? At the St. Boniface Museum

As well, we saw several plaques and interpretive signs. How did the creators of these signs establish historical significance and do you agree?

Use photos, video, and evidence you gathered from our tour to help you out and be sure to post your WordPress link in Edmodo and under this thread.

Be precise and clear, as your post will be visible to the entire world, via WordPress. Please check out the work of your colleagues and offer insight and praise. Can you determine your colleague’s argument? Are they being clear? What evidence are they using?

The Countess of Dufferin -- The first steam locomotive in the Northwest, circa 1877.

The Countess of Dufferin — The first steam locomotive in the Northwest, circa 1877.

A Walk Down Main Street — Historical Thinking

From Winnipeg Free Press via City of Winnipeg Archives (Portage & Main)

From Winnipeg Free Press via City of Winnipeg Archives (Portage & Main)

In our Canadian History classes at St. John’s-Ravenscourt School, we have been investigating the notion of history itself and the historical thinking concepts. We have had great conversations, spoken to world-class historians and archivists, and have done some heavy lifting. Now, it’s your turn to apply some of the skills and time to DO history!

On September 24th, we will have the opportunity to explore Main Street in Winnipeg. We will begin our journey at The Forks, where people of been meeting an trading for thousands of years. Next, we will hit up the new Upper Fort Garry to see how Red River began to develop. From there, we will cross Main Street and visit Union Station. Next, we will head to north on Main to take in some of the locations related to the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919. Our day will end with a special tour of the St. Boniface Museum.

Check out the films below to help you familiarize yourself with these amazing locations!

The Forks

http://www.theforks.com/uploads/biblio_file/1986-Junction_Rivers_RB-241_Priess.pdf?t=1301533967

Upper Fort Garry

Union Station

Winnipeg General Strike

St. Boniface Museum

http://www.tripfilms.com/Travel_Video-v67422-Saint_Boniface-Saint_Boniface_Museum-Video.html

Your task, during and following the tour, is to create your own historical walking tour of Winnipeg. As we walk down Main Street, decide what buildings and location are significant. Using Evernote, jot down notes, capture audio, take photos, shoot some video. Gather us much information as possible about these places and ask yourself what sort of evidence do you need in order to prove that they are significant. As well, try to explain the evolution of this area from 6000 years ago until today.

To help you, here are Randy Turner’s impressive articles in the Winnipeg Free Press entitled City Beautiful. What content can you pull from his histories and what primary sources does he use? These might prove useful and might help you decide what types of documents you might need.

Finally, you will create a walking tour and you will actually take friends and family on it! More on this part later…

Good luck!